ashaye-aro:

"If I love you, I have to make you conscious of the things you don’t see."

— James Baldwin

word.

(Source: blunthought)

(Reblogged from thechanelmuse)

ourblackproject:

The Black body, more so of women, have stood on the opposite side of the narrow Eurocentric standards of beauty. Black hairstyles have defiantly rebelled against and even when straightened added creative magic of Blackness and Boldness. 

Black hair, whether relaxed or natural, locked or shaven is beautiful. Black women are beautiful. 

Right on

(Reblogged from black-culture)

ras-al-ghul-is-dead:

A silent protest in Love Park, downtown Philadelphia orchestrated by performance artists protesting the murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson. The onslaught of passerby’s  wanting to take photos with the statue exemplifies the disconnect in American society.  Simply frame out the dead body, and it doesn’t exist.  

Here are some observations by one of the artists involved in the event:

I don’t know who any of these folks are.

They were tourists I presume.

But I heard most of what everything they said. A few lines in particular stood out. There’s one guy not featured in the photos. His friends were trying to get him to join the picture but he couldn’t take his eyes off the body.

"Something about this doesn’t feel right. I’m going to sit this one out, guys." "Com’on man… he’s already dead."

(Laughs.)

There were a billion little quips I heard today. Some broke my heart. Some restored my faith in humanity. There was an older white couple who wanted to take a picture under the statue.

The older gentleman: “Why do they have to always have to shove their politics down our throats.” Older woman: “They’re black kids, honey. They don’t have anything better to do.”

One woman even stepped over the body to get her picture. But as luck would have it the wind blew the caution tape and it got tangle around her foot. She had to stop and take the tape off. She still took her photo.

There was a guy who yelled at us… “We need more dead like them. Yay for the white man!”

"One young guy just cried and then gave me a hug and said ‘thank you. It’s nice to know SOMEBODY sees me.’

Wow

(Reblogged from reverseracism)

86thatshit:

2damnfeisty:

"14-year-old Parkview High School Freshman, Caleb Christian was concerned about the number of incidents of police abuse in the news.  Still, he knew there were many good police officers in various communities, but had no way of figuring out which communities were highly rated and which were not.  

So, together with his two older sisters: Parkview High School senior Ima Christian, and Gwinnett School of Math, Science, and Technology sophomore, Asha Christian, they founded a mobile app development company– Pinetart Inc., under which they created a mobile app called Five-O.

Five-O, allows citizens to enter the details of every interaction with a police officer.  It also allows them to rate that officer in terms of courtesy and professionalism and provides the ability to enter a short description of what transpired.  These details are captured for every county in the United States. Citizen race and age information data is also captured.

Additionally, Five-O allows citizens to store the details of each encounter with law enforcement; this provides convenient access to critical information needed for legal action or commendation.”

Read more here. [x]

Black Excellence

Go Download

(Source: skulls-and-tea)

(Reblogged from iamsircharles)
(Reblogged from reverseracism)

thanoblesavage:

Too Trill.

True

(Source: darvinasafo)

(Reblogged from reverseracism)

nomorewaterthefirenexttime:

thenewwomensmovement:

readabookson:

The Trouble Between Us: An Uneasy History of White and Black Women in the Feminist Movement

https://anonfiles.com/file/877975186837dbbbcd57d841ffe5c26e

Segregated Sisterhood: Racism Politics American Feminism

https://anonfiles.com/file/bbe6cc9f05335a8144fa0be2098a06e8

Black Sexual Politics: African Americans, Gender, and the New Racism

https://anonfiles.com/file/6923ebcd172d45425d86da18c1926644

Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the Politics of Empowerment

https://anonfiles.com/file/b4994a81e4c9747e42e1d5209e206dae

Ain’t I a Woman: Black Women and Feminism

https://anonfiles.com/file/81b95aa8e335602d1627e178361c8a72

Feminism Is For Everybody: Passionate Politics

https://anonfiles.com/file/5a31a895c6f4d226dd0ef07f88c8cbfd

The Womanist Reader: The First Quarter Century of Womanist Thought

https://anonfiles.com/file/dd9f429a320aab3076764568ae9be545

Black Feminist Voices in Politics

https://anonfiles.com/file/fb475479b90b47a6eebaf426840c9a29

Living for the Revolution: Black Feminist Organizations, 1968–1980

https://anonfiles.com/file/22aa61fc8933bb1dd59539d6a2662720

Wow, incredible list. We’re reading several of these in my graduate Black Feminist Thought class!

:D!!

(Reblogged from blackcappedchickadee)

theblackcollegian:

The Strange Fruit That Still Swing, George Washington University.

theblackcollegian.tumblr.com 

Wow

(Reblogged from reverseracism)
ankh-kush:

The Young Lords were a Puerto Rican-American revolutionary socialist political party inspired by the Black Panther Party and based off of a Chicago street gang turned revolutionary group. With branches in Chicago, East Harlem, the Bronx, as well as Puerto Rico, they hoped to reunite the Puerto Rican people in American and their homeland and join in the international revolutionary movement to liberate all oppressed people including workers, women, and Third World peoples.
They encouraged the people to be critical of them because they worked to serve the community and wanted to learn from their mistakes to best help the people. The New York Young Lords were divided into five main sub-organizations:
The Puerto Rican Worker’s Federation took the struggle into places of employment in an attempt to challenge and eventually overthrow capitalist economics. The Lumpen Organization worked with the class of people who, through extreme poverty, were forced into drug abuse and crime, and worked to organize within the prison movement, having direct ties to the Attica Rebellion of 1971. The Women’s Union organized around gender issues in the struggle, incorporating the fight against heterosexism and challenging machismo. The Puerto Rican Student Union organized in high schools and colleges, shifting students away from academia and intellectualism and towards real issues. The Committee for the Defense of the Community handled the people’s survival programs, such as free breakfast, health clinics, as well as helping with legal aid.

ankh-kush:

The Young Lords were a Puerto Rican-American revolutionary socialist political party inspired by the Black Panther Party and based off of a Chicago street gang turned revolutionary group. With branches in Chicago, East Harlem, the Bronx, as well as Puerto Rico, they hoped to reunite the Puerto Rican people in American and their homeland and join in the international revolutionary movement to liberate all oppressed people including workers, women, and Third World peoples.

They encouraged the people to be critical of them because they worked to serve the community and wanted to learn from their mistakes to best help the people. The New York Young Lords were divided into five main sub-organizations:

The Puerto Rican Worker’s Federation took the struggle into places of employment in an attempt to challenge and eventually overthrow capitalist economics. The Lumpen Organization worked with the class of people who, through extreme poverty, were forced into drug abuse and crime, and worked to organize within the prison movement, having direct ties to the Attica Rebellion of 1971. The Women’s Union organized around gender issues in the struggle, incorporating the fight against heterosexism and challenging machismo. The Puerto Rican Student Union organized in high schools and colleges, shifting students away from academia and intellectualism and towards real issues. The Committee for the Defense of the Community handled the people’s survival programs, such as free breakfast, health clinics, as well as helping with legal aid.

(Reblogged from blackgirlsrpretty2)